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BETTER BEAUTY

Environmentally-focused beauty brands prioritize sustainability

As concerns about the health of the environment continue to escalate, brands across all industries are stepping up to lessen, or altogether eliminate, their carbon footprints. This is especially true for the beauty industry, which is notorious for its use of paper and single-use plastic. The following beauty brands place a huge focus on sustainability, which is important to eco-conscious modern consumers.

ALIMA PURE

Clean beauty brand Alima Pure is honoring its founding commitment to protect the environment and save the planet—a mission which resonates with today’s eco-conscious youth. The brand claims to be completely carbon neutral through its use of reusable and recyclable packaging and contributions to carbonfund.org, which helps companies offset their carbon footprint. Alima Pure offers cosmetics in refillable compacts, magnetic color pans, and reusable food-grade plastic jars. The products are packaged in boxes made of 100% post-consumer recycled paper and eco-friendly soy-based ink; instead of bubble wrap, orders are shipped using recyclable geami paper. 

KAIA NATURALS

Beauty industry vet and founder of Kaia Naturals Mary Futher wanted to create a clean beauty brand that caters to the on-the-go lifestyle. The brand identified the personal care and beauty products with the greatest toxic impact and created all-natural alternatives that consumers can trust. Along with creating non-toxic products, Kaia Naturals also considers the ways in which it can lessen its carbon footprint. Its Juicy Bamboo Cleansing Cloths are both recyclable and biodegradable. The sheets come in a recyclable cardboard carton and the cloths biodegrade within 60 to 70 days, leaving no trace. 

KEVIN MURPHY

Australian hair care brand Kevin Murphy, which has amassed a cult following among high-end salons, is furthering its mission of sustainability, having announced that all of its bottle packaging will be made of 100% ocean plastic by mid-2019. The switch will remove 360 tons of plastic from the ocean and help create a circular supply chain. Kevin Murphy has partnered with Danish packaging manufacturer Pack Tech, which has already begun to source and process the plastic waste into innovative materials