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TRAVELER’S DELIGHT

Modern tourism campaigns get creative

As the travel vertical continues to evolve to meet the wants and needs of modern tourists, tourism boards are producing creative and attention-grabbing campaigns that resonate with modern young travelers.

LITHUANIA: THE G-SPOT OF EUROPE

Go Vilnius, the official municipal business development and tourism agency of Vilnius (the capital of Lithuania), unveiled a rather risqué travel campaign calling the city “the G-spot of Europe,” saying that it’s hard to locate, but once tourists find it, “the results are amazing.” The resulting deluge of both positive and negative international press coverage (including a feature on HBO’s Last Week Tonight with comedian John Oliver) only solidified the aim of the campaign, which was to bring awareness to a less well-known travel destination.

VIENNA: UNHASHTAG VIENNA

Vienna’s tourist board launched Unhashtag Vienna, a campaign that implores visitors to put down their smartphones and enjoy the city in an analog way. To kick off the campaign, the board conducted a public stunt at the Belvedere museum (a major Viennese tourist attraction) wherein a replica of Gustav Klimt’s iconic painting The Kiss was set up near the original and covered with a giant red hashtag, reinforcing the anti-Instagram nature of Unhashtag Vienna’s message. The overall campaign is meant to act as a conversation starter about the nature of modern travel and how it’s been transformed by tourists’ desire for social media content.

NEBRASKA: HONESTLY, IT’S NOT FOR EVERYONE

Last October, the Nebraska Tourism Commission rolled out a smartly self-deprecating tourism campaign for the Midwestern state, which the commission acknowledges is not exactly at the top of people’s travel bucket lists. The campaign contains slogans such as “Honestly, it’s not for everyone” and “Famous for our flat, boring landscapes” juxtaposed against images showing that the inverse is correct and that Nebraska is actually filled with natural beauty. In acknowledging state stereotypes while showing that they might be misinformed, the campaign came across as honest and appealing, two qualities that resonate with modern youth.