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DROP THAT MIXTAPE

Brands collaborate to release music

Modern youth consider music to be the most important category of popular culture in their lives, presenting brands the opportunity to connect with young consumers through the songs and artists they love. The following non-music brands collaborated with talented artists and producers to release original songs, demonstrating how any company can tap into youth’s passion for music.

CHEF BOYARDEE

Chef Boyardee enlisted the talents of rapper Lil Yachty and ‘70s pop artist Donny Osmond to give its jingle from the past a much needed update. Yachty and his go-to producer 30 Roc layered their signature melodies and vocals over a commercial jingle from back in the day; the new song, “Start the Par-dee,” is a genuinely cool, hypnotic tune that just happens to be about pasta. The unlikely collaboration shows how any brand, even a canned food brand, can use music to connect to today’s youth.

WILSON

Roger Federer is using his racket to serve more than just tennis balls—he’s also serving beats thanks to the sports equipment brand Wilson and music producer Money Mark, known for his work with the Beastie Boys. To market Federer’s Wilson Pro Staff RF 7 Autograph racket, Mark hooked it up to audio equipment to capture the bounces and whooshes of the instrument in play. He then mixed the sounds with electronic beats to produce an original song, “Play Your Heart Out.” For a casual $597, fans can purchase a limited edition RF 97 box set, which includes the original tune on vinyl, a racket, a tennis ball-shaped Bluetooth speaker, and a photobook.

Wendy’s upped its social media game when it rebranded its sweet, redheaded poster girl into a hilariously savage online personality, known for dragging other fast food brands like McDonald’s and Burger King on Twitter. Taking her sass one step further, the fast food brand dropped a hip-hop mixtape on Spotify called We Beefin?, which features five songs: “Twitter Fingers,” “Holding It Down,” “Rest in Grease,” “Clownin,” and “4 for $4.” This marketing move by Wendy’s demonstrates the brand’s understanding of digital culture and the importance of the hip-hop genre in the lives of modern youth.