Daily

HAVE BRANDS, WILL TRAVEL

Check out these travel-oriented brand activations, modified for the pandemic

Travel, like so many other activities, looks differently amid the pandemic—but the following brands are encouraging consumers to dream about far-flung adventures again, albeit with different approaches.

COORS LIGHT

While some companies have released on-brand and customized Zoom backgrounds for consumers, Coors Light is tapping into the new reality of Zoom ubiquity in a different way: the beer brand is sending five lucky winners on an exotic vacation to the location featured in a winner’s virtual Zoom background. The contest, held from the end of August through October 1st, required that entrants upload a screenshot of themselves in their “ideal video chat background” to a dedicated section of Coors Light’s website, and was part of the brand’s larger “Made to Chill” campaign that included broadcast, digital, and paid social touchpoints.

NATTY LIGHT

Natural Light is holding a contest to send fans on a “Nattified” flight to… nowhere. As it’s unwise to travel during the ongoing pandemic, Natty Light is only having this flight take off and land in the same airport, but the brand is designing the plane to provide such a fun experience that it’s betting the lucky winners won’t care. The contest launched on October 20th; to be considered, participants need to tell their social media followers “what they would name their private jet and why.” In this way, Natty Light is joining other airlines that have chartered flights to nowhere for pent-up consumers, but the brand’s contest setup provides an exciting (and budget-friendly) opportunity for fans of the light beer to engage in such an excursion.

HULU

On the other end of the spectrum, Hulu wants subscribers to “take a vacation in place” with its latest original series—and yes, it’s literally titled Vacation in Place. The show’s debut season includes five episodes, each of which contain immersive and relaxing scenes from “some of the most beautiful places around,” and is intended to give viewers “a mini-vacay” from wherever they are—but presumably their couch.