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SELF-SERVE

Self-care resources help Millennials prioritize their mental health 

Self-care is an investment many young people are willing to make to ensure they lead a healthy lifestyle; 61% of youth say that the ritual of taking care of themselves at home has become more important in recent years. These self-care resources serve as a free way to explore the subject and prioritize wellness in the midst of a busy schedule.

ALOE

While working as Hillary Clinton’s Digital Strategist for the 2016 election, Amber Discko became overwhelmed, stressed, and neglectful of self-care. Realizing a little help and self-love were needed in order to assuage anxiety and depression, the Aloe app was born after Discko created a self-care survey during the inauguration and received positive feedback. The app serves as a check-in service to aid in physical, mental, and emotional health. Aloe poses simple daily questions like, “Have you been going to sleep on time?” and “Have you had anything to drink in the last two hours?” Users can check-in as many times as they want and can also choose a plant emoji to put in a virtual garden.

GIRLS’ NIGHT IN

This weekly newsletter serves to help women with their mental health by sending self-care articles from the Girls Night In website and other pieces from around the Internet. The newsletter has 60,000 subscribers, and the site also holds a book club with meetups in seven cities. Every Friday morning, subscribers receive articles that cover topics like body image, skincare, cozy nights in and tools to help create better lifestyle habits. The website also features inspiring women with different backgrounds who share advice on balancing busy lives.

SELF SERVICE

Girlboss, Jerico Mandybur hosts Self Service, a weekly wellness podcast described as a “cosmic comfort zone” that covers topics like self-love, staying hydrated and boundaries. The podcast offers tarot card readings, astrological forecasts, and expert guests to give listeners the scoop on their trade and advice. Mandybur’s goal is to help women who are new to self-care ease into the practice and learn what works for them in spirituality, health, and personal care. It’s important to Mandybur that women feel good about self-indulgence instead of shame and uses her new platform to spread this message of serving oneself wholeheartedly and unabashedly.