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BODY TALK

Brands (slowly but surely) move towards size equality

The fashion industry still has a looong way to go to put an end to size discrimination, but bit by bit, brands are taking crucial steps towards body equality. Today, we’re taking a look at a few great initiatives, including casting diverse bodies, enlisting body-image experts to consult on campaigns, and (finally!) expanding size ranges.

VICTORIA'S SECRET

As Victoria’s Secret begins to introduce larger sizes for the first time ever, they’ve tapped plus-size TikTok star Remi Bader, who has 2.1 million followers on the app, as a brand ambassador. Bader, 26, will also serve as a size consultant for the brand as they look to become more size-inclusive following body-image controversies and leadership changes. VS is starting with Pink’s popular swimwear line, which is now available up to a size XXL for the first time; next month, they’ll introduce expanded sizes in intimates and apparel in stores – also a first. We applaud these first moves and look forward to seeing more: Offering a range of sizes online and IRL is a crucial step towards body equality.

MACY’S

Social media influencers Denise Mercedes and Maria Castellanos are known for their #StyleNotSize TikTok and Instagram videos, in which the two real-life friends, one a size 14 and the other a size 6, show themselves wearing the same clothes to promote body acceptance. Now, the pals are teaming up with Macy’s on a limited-run line of stylish loungewear offered in sizes XS to XXL, as well as in plus sizes 1X to 3X. The capsule collection under Macy’s private-label Jenni brand will be made available in three drops, the first of which is already out. This partnership comes on the heels of a successful collaboration between the #StyleNotSize women and Abercrombie, which resulted in more than $250,000 in merchandise sales through the influencers’ own affiliate links.

GAP & OLD NAVY

Though retailers like Brandy Melville have been criticized for their exclusionary one-size-fits-most approach, several retailers are putting a more positive spin on the strategy. Gap’s new Ace Jean, made of an accommodatingly stretchy cotton/polyester/elastane blend, is broken up into four size ranges: 24-26, 27-29, 30-32, and 33-35. Multi-sized denim reduces the need to buy new jeans as weight fluctuates – and given that the average woman fluctuates up to five pounds in a single day, this strategy certainly has legs. Sister brand Old Navy, similarly, launched a three-sizes-in-one FitsYou jean, with ranges such as 2-6 or 26-30. This is just the latest example of Old Navy’s commitment to size equality; last fall, the retailer did away with separate styles and pricing for plus-size clothing, instead opting to offer all women’s apparel from size 0 to 30.


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Have a tip on an exciting cultural moment or trend? Have feedback on how to make Cassandra Daily better? Just want to chat about this topic? Email us at info@cassandra.co.