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The Everyday Equality Report Intro

Young adults have long been reporting a growing awareness around larger cultural issues, as well as social and economic inequality, thanks in part to the spread of ideas via social media and the steady dismantling of taboos around outdated stigmas. But as with seemingly everything this year, the confluence of the global Covid-19 pandemic and this summer’s reignited BLM movement has brought that awareness to the forefront. Gen Zs and Millennials are increasingly examining their own day-to-day behaviors to see if they hold up to the causes they champion on social media. But their everyday actions—such as inviting a friend of a different race or sexual orientation to their house—don’t necessarily match up to their reported self awareness.


Not only are we noting this discrepancy in regards to race and identity, but we’re also seeing it around systemic socio-economic inequality. Today’s young adults are finding their economic aspirations under pressure by today’s economy, and they’re realizing society is more interconnected than was apparent before the pandemic. As a result, they’re keen to shore up smaller brands, and want larger brands to assist in this endeavor.

The Everyday Equality Report explores two key topics in light of the pandemic and the on-going dialogue about racism.

  • Get ready to understand the discrepancy between how young adults report a greater self-awareness around social issues like race and gender identity yet don’t quite demonstrate daily action that backs this assertion up in Race & Equality in Everyday Life. We also examine Millennials’ and Zs’ appetites for diverse entertainment, as well as their growing preference for learning about social issues on social media.
  • Learn how The Pandemic of Inequality is shaping the lives of Millennials and Gen Zs across the areas of employment, education, and healthcare. We explore how the disparity is increasingly visible in terms of citywide crime and disorder, and hear from young adults about the role of the 1%, ultimately painting a picture of how economic inequality affects the behaviors, attitudes, and aspirations for young people today.


92% OF U.S. TRENDSETTERS AGREE THAT THEY’VE BECOME MORE SELF-AWARE (AROUND ISSUES SUCH AS RACE AND INEQUALITY) IN THE PAST YEAR, ALONG WITH 82% OF U.S. MILLENNIALS AND 79% OF U.S. GEN ZS.

9 IN 10 TRENDSETTERS REPORTED LIKING WHEN ENTERTAINMENT (INCLUDING MOVIES, MUSIC, TV, AND BOOKS) DRAWS ATTENTION TO SOCIAL ISSUES, WHILE AROUND 7 IN 10 ZS AND YS (71% AND 69%, RESPECTIVELY) ALSO SAID THIS.

33% OF WHITE YOUTH SAY THEY HAVE MONEY SET ASIDE FOR AN EMERGENCY/RAINY DAY FUND, COMPARED TO ONLY 22% OF BLACK YOUTH.

1 IN 10 YOUNG PEOPLE SAY THEY COULD NOT GET BY ON THEIR SAVINGS/ASSETS IF THEIR HOUSEHOLD LOST ITS SOURCE OF INCOME.